Linux

How to View Line Numbers in vi

The vi vs vim debate can be just as heated among some people as the vi vs emacs debate, but regardless of where you stand there are a few situations where you might find yourself with vi and no other option. It’s a standard part of POSIX and therefore it’s …

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How to Fix No Sound in Linux

Sometimes it seems you just can get the sound in Linux to work no matter what you try. You’ll first want to check the volume to make sure your speakers or headphones are working. Try checking the volume control in the system tray and then check the volume controls on …

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How to Tell if You’re Using SATA or PATA on Linux

Traditional Parallel ATA disks still exist to some degree alongside SATA drives. You may be used to calling PATA by the name IDE or a number of other names. Should you be running an active machine, you probably don’t want to open up the case just to see what kind …

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How to Unregister Wine File Associations in Linux

Whether you use Wine to run critical business applications or just play a bunch of fun games that are only available for Microsoft Windows, Wine will actually start to register file associations for the different extensions that Windows programs use. You might not want to have old ones from programs …

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How to Check busybox Version & Installation Information

The busybox binary offers you a ton of different little versions of Unix programs all wrapped up into one big package. You might use it because you’re on a tiny version of Linux that doesn’t feature some of these command utilities. At times even users of the biggest distributions might …

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How to Know if You’re Using SSD or HDD Parts in Linux

Gamers running powerful PCs, system administrators taking care of giant servers and people who are working with sealed mobile devices all have a tendency to run into the same issue. It’s easy to forget whether you’re using SSD or HDD parts. Disks largely come in two forms today, and solid-state …

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How to Find My External IP Address in Linux

While there are a number of command line solutions for finding your IP address in Linux, most of these are geared toward finding the unique address numbers assigned to your device. If you want to find out the IP address that HTTP sites identify you as externally, then you’ll more …

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Filesystem Hierarchy Standard Explained

The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard or FHS defines how the directory structure in Linux works, and it’s something that many beginner articles have already been written about. That being said, it’s also still one of the things that confuse beginners the most and therefore questions about it still get asked all …

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How to Define a System-wide Compose Key in Linux

Many people define compose keys so that they can type international characters as well as the symbol for the Euro and Pound Stirling on a local keyboard. It’s very useful for those who need to write these characters without having to look them up in a character map but don’t …

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How to Fix 400 Bad Request Chrome Error on Linux

You may from time to time receive a message that reads 400 Bad Request while trying to browse the Web with Chrome on Linux. While this error is by no means restricted to this browser or even this operating system, many users report that it’s a major problem when running …

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How to View a List of Users in Linux

While you probably know how to log into your Linux system with a single user account and you’re familiar with the root account, you more than likely don’t have a simple utility for viewing all of the accounts currently on your system. Fortunately, a single command line hack is all …

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How to List All Linux Commands Your Shell Knows

There’s actually a command to list all other commands that a Linux shell knows, but more than likely you’re not familiar with it. If there’s ever been a counterintuitive Catch-22 in regards to using GNU/Linux-based operating system command lines, then this is it. That being said, it’s fortunately extremely easy …

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How to Clear Out Xfce4 Sessions

While Xfce4 is an extremely popular Linux desktop environment, it can start to exhibit weird behavior over time. You might notice that it doesn’t seem as snappy as it once did or perhaps it tends to be really slow to start up when booting your machine. Windows might pop up …

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How to Delete Large Blocks of Text in GNU’s nano Editor

While there’s an editor war on, the nano editor continues to be extremely popular. It’s the default console text editor in several different Linux distributions at this point, and it’s proven popular with some coders as well. It’s not easy to use some of the advanced options right out of …

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How to Join GoToMeeting on GNU/Linux

Standalone applications from GoToMeeting only officially support the Microsoft Windows and macOS platforms. Nevertheless, it’s become an extremely common way for developers and business personnel to communicate online. Few Linux users would want to have to migrate to another operating system merely because of a single app, no matter how …

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What is a Terminal Emulator

Users of GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, macOS and other Unix implementations are probably used to hearing the words terminal emulator thrown around. However, fewer users are aware of why exactly this term is so common. Terminal emulators are extremely common pieces of software, but they’re not the same things as the command …

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What Does ‘apt’ mean in Linux Distributions?

If you’re a user of a Debian-based Linux distribution, then you probably see the word apt an awful lot. This goes for users of Ubuntu, the various Ubuntu spins, Linux Mint, LXLE and Trisquel GNU/Linux. While it refers to the package manager that helps you install software on your system, …

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How to Check PCI Slots in Linux

PCI slots and PCI express slots are everywhere. Since the bus is even used inside of netbooks and ultrabooks, you’ll probably need to check a little bit of information about them from time to time in the most unlikely of places. GNU/Linux includes a couple of commands that let you …

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How to Change CentOS Hostname

CentOS, Red Hat and Fedora Linux implementations work a bit differently from Debian-based ones. CentOS 7 and newer feature some Debian-like controls such as the  but some coders feel this isn’t part of the Red Hat experience. As a result, there’s a separate way to change CentOS hostname values that should …

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How to View a CPU Chart in Linux

You can easily get a CPU chart right from the Linux command line. While there are plenty of graphical process tools that you can use with various Linux distributions, you’ll find that the command line ones work well enough as it is. They’re snappy and feature a light footprint. GUI …

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How to Check CPU Temperature ‘Core by Core’ on Linux

You might be used to using slick graphical tools to check computer temperature on other operating systems, but you won’t actually need anything so bloated when you’re using Linux. If you’re sick of poking around in administrator control panels for CPU temperature and voltage, then you’re in for a big …

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Best Alternatives for a Genuine Unix Download

If you’re looking for a genuine Unix download, then you’re going to be looking for quite some time. The original Unix operating system doesn’t exist as a standalone entity any longer. While we often talk about Google Android and GNU/Linux as Unix system, they’re technically descended from Unix clones. This …

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How to Compute Md5sum Lists

Users of various Unix implementations including Linux and FreeBSD are probably used to seeing checksum numbers that correspond to the Md5sum or Sha256sum standards. You’ve probably downloaded an ISO and run the md5sum command on it to make sure that you’ve downloaded it right. These hex numbers are sums of …

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How to Change root Password on Linux

The root account has the ability to control anything on a Unix system, and Linux is no different. One has to use the passwd command to change Linux password data, and the same goes for root. Due to the special nature of this command, some precautions do apply. Notably, it’s …

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How to Ping Google in Linux

The ping command sends an ECHO_REQUEST to a remote server in order to judge just how solid a connection is. You could ping any remote host that you’d like via a host name or an IP address, but many administrators ping Google since it’s a stable site that many people …

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