Linux

How to Delete Large Blocks of Text in GNU’s nano Editor

While there’s an editor war on, the nano editor continues to be extremely popular. It’s the default console text editor in several different Linux distributions at this point, and it’s proven popular with some coders as well. It’s not easy to use some of the advanced options right out of …

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How to Join GoToMeeting on GNU/Linux

Standalone applications from GoToMeeting only officially support the Microsoft Windows and macOS platforms. Nevertheless, it’s become an extremely common way for developers and business personnel to communicate online. Few Linux users would want to have to migrate to another operating system merely because of a single app, no matter how …

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What is a Terminal Emulator

Users of GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, macOS and other Unix implementations are probably used to hearing the words terminal emulator thrown around. However, fewer users are aware of why exactly this term is so common. Terminal emulators are extremely common pieces of software, but they’re not the same things as the command …

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What Does ‘apt’ mean in Linux Distributions?

If you’re a user of a Debian-based Linux distribution, then you probably see the word apt an awful lot. This goes for users of Ubuntu, the various Ubuntu spins, Linux Mint, LXLE and Trisquel GNU/Linux. While it refers to the package manager that helps you install software on your system, …

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How to Check PCI Slots in Linux

PCI slots and PCI express slots are everywhere. Since the bus is even used inside of netbooks and ultrabooks, you’ll probably need to check a little bit of information about them from time to time in the most unlikely of places. GNU/Linux includes a couple of commands that let you …

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How to Change CentOS Hostname

CentOS, Red Hat and Fedora Linux implementations work a bit differently from Debian-based ones. CentOS 7 and newer feature some Debian-like controls such as the  but some coders feel this isn’t part of the Red Hat experience. As a result, there’s a separate way to change CentOS hostname values that should …

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How to View a CPU Chart in Linux

You can easily get a CPU chart right from the Linux command line. While there are plenty of graphical process tools that you can use with various Linux distributions, you’ll find that the command line ones work well enough as it is. They’re snappy and feature a light footprint. GUI …

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How to Check CPU Temperature ‘Core by Core’ on Linux

You might be used to using slick graphical tools to check computer temperature on other operating systems, but you won’t actually need anything so bloated when you’re using Linux. If you’re sick of poking around in administrator control panels for CPU temperature and voltage, then you’re in for a big …

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Best Alternatives for a Genuine Unix Download

If you’re looking for a genuine Unix download, then you’re going to be looking for quite some time. The original Unix operating system doesn’t exist as a standalone entity any longer. While we often talk about Google Android and GNU/Linux as Unix system, they’re technically descended from Unix clones. This …

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How to Compute Md5sum Lists

Users of various Unix implementations including Linux and FreeBSD are probably used to seeing checksum numbers that correspond to the Md5sum or Sha256sum standards. You’ve probably downloaded an ISO and run the md5sum command on it to make sure that you’ve downloaded it right. These hex numbers are sums of …

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How to Change root Password on Linux

The root account has the ability to control anything on a Unix system, and Linux is no different. One has to use the passwd command to change Linux password data, and the same goes for root. Due to the special nature of this command, some precautions do apply. Notably, it’s …

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How to Ping Google in Linux

The ping command sends an ECHO_REQUEST to a remote server in order to judge just how solid a connection is. You could ping any remote host that you’d like via a host name or an IP address, but many administrators ping Google since it’s a stable site that many people …

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How to Use CTRL R in Linux

If you’re using the modern bash shell, then you can use Ctrl+R as a keyboard shortcut to search through your command history. You can bring up commands that you used previously and issue them over again. This might work in other shells as well, such as if you’re using ksh …

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How to Free Linux Buffers and Caches

Users may want to free Linux buffer and cache space if they think that it’s taking up too much room in RAM. This is usually because they’re used to Windows or Macintosh environments that don’t cache as aggressively. Doing this can actually reduce performance. However, it’s a good idea to …

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How to Restart Firefox from the Command Line

Users of Linux are more than likely used to seeing Firefox installed on their systems by default, and they might very well type the name of the program in a terminal to start it. The name of the browser in all lower case is enough to start it up, but …

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Fix: sudo command not found

If you’re an experienced Linux user, then you’ll probably find a sudo command not found error extremely disconcerting. You’ve more than likely gotten used to putting sudo in front of any command you need privileged administrator access for. This is doubly true if you’re a user of Ubuntu or any …

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How to Use bc as a Hex Calculator

Various Unix-like operating system implementations like Linux and pretty much anything that has the GNU suite includes the bc basic calculator language. Its syntax is very similar to the C programming language. You can use it as a hex calculator right from the command line, so you won’t ever need …

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Difference: Unix vs Linux vs BSD

Learning the differences of how to use the terminology Unix vs Linux is a great way to start a flame war. Some people consider these issues to be extremely important from a political standpoint. New users will certainly want some primer to go by, so it’s safe to say that …

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How to Use the Recursive Linux Make Directory Command

Generally, when you use the mkdir Linux make directory command you create a single subdirectory that lives in whatever directory your prompt is currently sitting in. If you were in ~/Documents and you typed mkdir Memoranda, then you’d create a single directory called Memoranda that lived in ~/Documents. You don’t …

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How to Set the Date and Time with Unix Epoch Format

The Unix epoch started at 00:00:00 UTC on Thursday, January 1, 1970. Ever since then Unix systems have kept track of time by counting the number of seconds since that date occurred. Unix, and the various implementations like Linux and FreeBSD, keep track of time as a literal number of …

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How to Find MAC Address on Linux

If you need to find MAC address numbers for any network interface attached to your computer, then Linux makes this quite easy. Each computer network interface receives a unique Media Access Control (MAC) address, which explains what device it belongs to. No two MAC addresses are alike. Users with multiple …

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Fix: GNU make is required

If you use FreeBSD, then you might see the following error when you’re trying to compile C code – configure: error: GNU make is required! Assuming that you’re already working on a command line interface as this error would generally only appear in such, you’d probably try to change into …

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How to Create a File in Linux

There are many reasons you might want to create a file on a quick and easy basis in Linux with as little playing around as possible. You might want to make a placeholder for something you plan to put in later on. Many programs require a single blank file present …

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How to Take Screenshots on Lubuntu 16.04 or Higher

If you’re used to using Microsoft Windows or some other different Linux distribution, then you might be confused when you attempt to take a screenshot on Lubuntu 16.04 or any of the versions that come out after it. Since 16.04 and 16.04.2 are long-term releases, you shouldn’t see any drastic …

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How to Untar a File in Linux

When you work with Linux, FreeBSD or other Unix implementations, you’ll often see files that end in .tar and may even have other extensions after it. Even some experienced users don’t know the simple way to extract these from a command line. Some users who are used to working purely …

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