Fix: VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled)

Several users are encountering the VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled) error when trying to open a virtual machine with VM Virtualbox. The issue is reported to occur on all the recent Windows versions and on some Ubuntu distributions. The nature of the virtual machine doesn’t seem to be important as there are reported occurrences with both Windows and Ubuntu virtual sessions that fail with the same error message.

VT-x is disabled in the BIOS for all CPU modes (VERR_VMX_MSR_ALL_VMX_DISABLED
VT-x is disabled in the BIOS for all CPU modes (VERR_VMX_MSR_ALL_VMX_DISABLED

What is causing the VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled)?

We investigated this particular error message by looking at various user report and the solution that they used to fix the issue. This problem is not easy to fix since it occurs on both Windows and Linux. However, we managed to spot a few common scenarios that are known to trigger this particular error message:

  • Virtualization Technology (VT-X) is disabled from BIOS – Most of the time, this particular issue occurs because VT-X is disabled from the BIOS level on the machine. A 64-bit host needs to have Virtualization Technology (VTx) enabled in the BIOS. On some machines, you’ll also need to enable Virtualization Technology Directed I/O (VTd).
  • Your CPU doesn’t support VT-X / AMD-V – Another possible scenario is that your CPU is simply not equipped to support virtualization. This can occur with old setups that use an old CPU.
  • PAE and NX are disabled on the host CPU – Several users have reported that the issue was resolved after they made sure that the virtualized CPU is configured to run with Physical Adress Extension (PAE) and NX.
  • Allocated RAM is insufficient or exceeding the system’ capabilities – Changing the default Base Memory value has helped a lot of users encountering the same issue to resolve it entirely.
  • 3rd-party security solution is interfering with VT-X Vt-D – There are several 3rd party AV clients that are known to cause interference with VirtualBox. Establishing a rule o uninstalling the Av client completely will resolve the conflict.

If you’re currently struggling to resolve this particular issue, this article will provide you with a list of quality troubleshooting steps. Below you have a collection of methods that other users in a similar situation have followed to get the issue resolved.

For the best results, follow the methods below in the order that they are presented until you encounter a fix that resolves the problem in your particular scenario.

Method 1: Verify whether your CPU supports VT-X/ AMD-V

Before you try anything else, let’s make sure that the system that you’re encountering the issue on is designed to accommodate VT-X (Intel) or AMD-V (AMD). If your CPU is old enough, it’s possible that it was simply not designed to support virtualization.

There are several methods that you can follow to verify if your CPU supports virtualization, but we’re going to take the easy route. SecurAble is a freeware that will help us determine your processor features and tell us whether virtualization is achievable.

Here’s a quick guide on downloading and using SecurAble to see whether your CPU supports virtualization:

  1. Visit this link (here), scroll down to the download section and click on Download now.

    Downloading SecurAble
    Downloading SecurAble
  2. Once the utility is downloaded, simply open the executable and you’re good to go. Click Yes at the UAC (User Account Prompt) and wait until your CPU is analyzed.
  3. Once the results show up, check to see if you have an Yes directly above Hardware Virtualization.
    Hardware Virtualization is supported in this example
    Hardware Virtualization is supported in this example

    If you confirm that hardware virtualization is supported, you can follow the methods below in order knowing that one of them will resolve the VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled) error.

In the event that the test showed that your machine does not support hardware virtualization, you will not be able to resolve the issue using the methods below.

Method 2: Enable Virtualization Technology (VTX) from BIOS

If you’re encountering the issue on a 64-bit host, keep in mind that you’ll likely need to enable Virtualization Technology (VTx) from your BIOS settings. On some motherboards, you will also need to enable Virtualization Technology Directed I/O (VTd)

Some motherboards come with this option enabled by default, but manual user intervention or 3rd party interference might disable it.

Note: Windows Hyper V can also be responsible from disabling VT-x on your computer.

Keep in mind that the exact menu options that involve the enabling VT-X or AMD-V will be different according to your motherboard. But in general, the steps are roughly the same. Here’s a quick guide on making sure that VT-X or AMD-V is enabled in your BIOS settings:

  1. Start your machine and press the Setup key repeatedly until you enter your BIOS. The Setup key will typically be displayed on-screen immediately after you power up your computer. If you don’t see it, try repeatedly pressing the F keys (F2, F4, F8, F10, F12) or the Del key (Dell computers) until you get it right.
    press a key to enter setup or bios
    Press [key] to enter setup
    Note: You can do an online search with your “*motherboard version*  BIOS key ” to save yourself from experimenting with different combinations.
  2. Once you enter your BIOS settings, go to Security > System Security and enable Virtualization Technology (VTx) and/or Virtualization Technology DIrected I/O (VTd). 

    Enabling virtualization on a HP-based BIOS
    Enabling virtualization on an HP-based BIOS

    Note: Keep in mind that the names or location will be different depending on your motherboard. On some BIOS versions, you’ll need to enable Virtualization Technology from Advanced BIOS Features. On Intel-based motherboards, you can enable virtualization from Advanced > Intel(R) Virtualization Technology.

  3. Once virtualization technology has been enabled on the machine, save your current BIOS configuration and exit your BIOS settings to allow your machine to restart.
  4. At the next startup, see if the issue has been resolved by attempting to open the same virtual machine (the one that was previously showing the error message)

If you’re still encountering the same  VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled) error, move down to the next method below.

Method 3: Enable PAE/NX from VirtualBox Manager

Several users struggling to resolve the same error message have reported that the issue was resolved entirely after they juggled with the Virtual device settings and enabled PAE/NX from the Settings menu.

This option determines whether PAE (Physical Adress Extension) and NX  capabilities of the host CPU will be exposed to the virtual machine.

Although this is not guaranteed to work, it’s typically reported to resolve the issue on 64-bit computers that are confirmed to support hardware virtualization. Here’s a quick guide on enabling PAE/NX from Oracle VM VirtualBox:

  1. Select the machine that is showing the error message from the left-hand pane and then click on the Settings icon.
    Accessing the Settings menu of the failing machine
    Accessing the Settings menu of the failing machine
  2. In the Settings window of the virtual machine, go to the System section (using the left pane) and access the Processor tab. Then make sure that the Enable PAE /NX checkbox (associated with Extended Features) is checked.
    go to System > Processor and check the box associated with Enable PAE/NX
    go to System > Processor and check the box associated with Enable PAE/NX
  3. Save the changes and start the virtual machine again.

If you’re still seeing the VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled) error when attempting to start the virtual machine, move down to the next method below.

Method 4: Increasing the RAM size 

Several users encountering the same issue have reported that the issue was resolved after they increased the allocated RAM size and started the virtual machine again.

Update: Some users have reported that in their case, the fix involved actually reducing the allocated RAM size.

If the methods above have proven to be ineffective, follow the steps below to either increase or decrease the RAM size:

  1. Select the virtual machine that is giving you trouble and click the Settings icon.
    Accessing the Settings menu of the failing machine
    Accessing the Settings menu of the failing machine
  2. In the Settings window, go to System and access the Motherboard tab. Once you get there, increase the allocated memory (Base Memory) by adjusting the slider, then click Ok to save the changes.
    Enlarging the Base Memory
    Enlarging the Base Memory
  3. Run the virtual machine and see if the issue has been resolved. If you’re still seeing the same error, return to the Motherboard tab using step 2 to and bring the Base Memory lower than what it was initially.
    Shrinking the Base Memory
    Shrinking the Base Memory
  4. Run the machine again and see if the issue has been resolved.

Method 5: Preventing 3rd party antivirus from interfering with hardware virtualization

An unlikely culprit but one that has been identified to cause the issue times and times again is the 3rd party antivirus solution. Several users encountering the same issue have reported that in their case, Avast (or another 3rd party AV client) was triggering the error message.

As it turns out, several 3rd party security solutions are running something in the background to create a “sandbox” feature. This ends up locking up the virtualization features from being used by VirtualBox or a similar client.

If you’re using a 3rd party security client, disabling the real-time protection from it will not help you to resolve the issue. The same security rules will remain firmly in place whether your AV is actively running or not.

If you’re using Avast, you can prevent the security client from interfering with VirtualBox by going to Settings > Troubleshooting and unchecking the box associated with Enable hardware-assisted virtualization. Restart your system once you’ve made this change.

Disabling Avast's hardware virtualization
Disabling Avast’s hardware virtualization

If you’re using a different client, search online for the equivalent setting. But keep in mind that some 3rd party AV clients will not allow you to disable the sandboxing feature.

If that’s the case, the only solution is to uninstall your third-party AV completely from your system. You can do this easily by following this guide (here).

Kevin Arrows


Kevin is a dynamic and self-motivated information technology professional, with a Thorough knowledge of all facets pertaining to network infrastructure design, implementation and administration. Superior record of delivering simultaneous large-scale mission critical projects on time and under budget.

Expert Tip

Fix: VT-X is Disabled in the Bios for All CPU Modes (Verr_Vmx_Msr_All_Vmx_Disabled)

If the issue is with your Computer or a Laptop you should try using Restoro which can scan the repositories and replace corrupt and missing files. This works in most cases, where the issue is originated due to a system corruption. You can download Restoro by clicking the Download button below.

Download Now

I'm not interested

Close