How to Open Local Group Policy Editor on Windows 10

Local Group Policy Editor will let you control a lot of settings that don’t necessarily have a graphical representation without having to modify the Registry.  When used correctly, the Group policy is a powerful tool capable of unlocking and disabling features that are normally inaccessible via the conventional paths.

How to Open Local Group Policy Editor on Windows

What is Local Group Policy Editor

The Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) is essentially a Management Console (MMC) snap-in that acts as a common interface for all Computer Configuration and User Configuration settings. The administrator can use the gpedit.msc tool to create policies that will then be applied to the computer (regardless of who’s accessing it) or only to certain users that log-in with their user’s accounts.

If the administrator uses Computer Configuration to set policy, the settings will be applied to all users regardless of who is logged on. If the administrators make use of User Configuration to enforce a policy, it will apply to those users (regardless of the computer that they use).

By default, the policies that are enforced with Local Group Policy Editor produce effects with all users unless the administrator specifies otherwise.

Note: Keep in mind that the Local Group Policy Editor is only found on Windows 10 Enterprise, Windows 10 Education, and Windows 10 Pro editions. If you don’t have one of these editions but you still want to use the Local Group Policy Editor, you can install Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) on Windows 10 Home Edition.

How to Open Local Policy Editor

Once you are certain that your computer is equipped to open the Local Group Policy Editor, here’s a list of different methods that you can use to open the gpedit.msc tool in Windows 10. Keep in mind that all methods will help you achieve the same thing, so follow whichever method seems more convenable to your situation.

Note: Keep in mind that whatever method you end up using, you need to be signed in with an administrator account to open and use the Local Group Policy Editor.

Method 1: Open Local Group Policy Editor via a Run Box

This is one of the quickest ways to access the Local Group Policy Editor. To open the gpedit.msc tool from a Run box, press Windows key + R to open up a Run box. Then, type “gpedit.msc” and hit Enter to open the Local Group Policy Editor.

Run gpedit.msc Command

Note: If you get a message saying the “Windows cannot find gpedit.msc”, it’s probably because your Windows 10 version is not equipped to open the Local Group Policy Editor.

Method 2: Open Local Group Policy Editor via the Search bar

Another speedy way to get around opening the gpedit.msc tool is via the search function. Here’s how to do this:

  1. Start by clicking on the Windows start bar (bottom-left corner) or press the Windows key.
  2. Then, type gpedit.msc to make use of the search function. Next, click on the Edit group policy and click the Yes button at the UAC (User Account Control).

    Search Edit group policy in Windows Start Menu

Method 3: Open Local Group Policy Editor via Command Prompt

Another way to go around opening the Local Group Policy Editor is to use Command Prompt to launch the gpedit.msc tool. Here’s how to do this:

  1. Open a Command Prompt window (it doesn’t have to be elevated) – to open a Command Prompt window, either access the start bar (Windows key) and use the search function to search for “cmd” or press Windows key + R to open a Run box, then type “cmd” and press Enter to open a Command Prompt Window.
Run CMD Command

2. Then in the Command Prompt window, simply type gpedit.msc and press Enter to open the Local Group Policy Editor.

Open gpedit.msc via Command Prompt

Method 4: Open a Local Group Policy Editor in PowerShell

Another way to open the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) tool is via Powershell. The procedure is highly similar to the Command Prompt. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Open Powershell by accessing the Windows Start menu, type “PowerShell” and click on Windows Powershell.
    Open Windows PowerShell Through Windows Start Menu

    Note: Additionally, you can open Windows Powershell by opening a Run box (Windows key + R), typing “PowerShell” and hitting Enter to open Windows Powershell.

  2. In Powershell, type “gpedit.msc” and hit Enter to open the Local Group Policy Editor.
    Open gpedit.msc Via Windows PowerShell

Method 5: Opening the Local Group Policy Editor via Control Panel

Another way to open the gpedit.msc tool is via the old Control Panel menu. As you know, Microsoft is slowly replacing the old Control Panel with the new Settings menu, but that doesn’t mean you can no longer access it. Follow the steps down below to open the Local Group Policy Editor from the Control Panel menu:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a new Run box. Then, type “control” and hit Enter to open the old Control Panel menu.
    Run Control Command
  2. In Control Panel,  click on Administrative Tools and then double click on Local Group Policy Editor.
    Open Administrative Tools in Control Panel

    Note: Another way to do this is to use the search function in the top-right corner to search for group policy, then click on Edit group policy.

Method 6: Opening the Local Group Policy Editor via Settings

Another way to open the Local Group Policy Editor is via the Settings charm. Here’s a quick guide on how to do this:

  1. Press Windows key + I to open the Settings app of Windows 10.
  2. Then, use the search function of the Settings app to search for “group policy“.
  3. Next, click on the Edit group policy to open the Local Group Policy Editor.
    Search Group Policy in Settings App of Windows

Method 7: Open Local Group Policy Editor by using Task Manager

Windows Task Manager can also be used to open the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) directly. This is a feature in-built as a function in Task Manager since the beginning.

  1. Right-click on Taskbar and then click on Task Manager.
    Open Task Manager
  2. Click on the File Menu and then click or tap “Run new task“.
    Run New Task in Task Manager
  3. Now in the “Create new task” window, type “gpedit.msc” in the Open field and then press ENTER.
    Run New Task of gpedit.msc in Task Manager

    Note: Another thing to try is pressing Windows + R, typing “gpedit.msc” and pressing Enter.

Method 8: Open Local Group Policy Editor by using Windows Explorer

Windows Explorer can also be used to open the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc).

  1. Open File Explorer.
  2. Now in the address bar, type type “gpedit.msc” and press ENTER.
    Type gpedit.msc in the Address Bar of File Explorer

Method 9: Open the Local Group Policy Editor Through Exe File

The manual way to open the gpedit.msc tool is to manually browse to the location of the Local Group Policy Editor and double-click on the executable. Here’s a quick guide on how to do this:

  1. Open Windows File Explorer and navigate to
    C:\ Windows \ System32.
  2. Then, either locate gpedit.msc manually or use the search function (top-right corner) to search for it.
    Open gpedit.msc from System 32 Folder
  3. Double-click on gpedit.msc to open up the Local Group Policy Editor and click Yes at the UAC prompt.

Note: If you find yourself using the gpedit.msc utility frequently, you can create a shortcut by right-clicking on it and choosing  Send to > Desktop.

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Kevin Arrows


Kevin is a dynamic and self-motivated information technology professional, with a Thorough knowledge of all facets pertaining to network infrastructure design, implementation and administration. Superior record of delivering simultaneous large-scale mission critical projects on time and under budget.

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How to Open Local Group Policy Editor on Windows 10

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