How To'sWindows

FIX: Account has been disabled. Please see your System Administrator

One of the most terrifying problems that any Windows 10 user has ever faced is the “Account has been disabled” problem. The “Account has been disabled” error message (or the “Account has been disabled. Please see your System Administrator” message – to be more specific) basically says that a user account has, for some reason, been disabled.

The “Account has been disabled” problem can appear either after something goes wrong and you are locked out of your user account for some reason or your computer shuts down inappropriately while you are in the process of creating a user account after a fresh Windows 10 installation or upgrade. If this problem appears after your computer shuts down inappropriately while you are in the middle of creating a user account after a fresh Windows 10 installation or upgrade, you will be greeted with a user account named defaultuser0 when you boot the computer up, and any attempts to login to this user account will be greeted by the “Account has been disabled” problem.

The “Account has been disabled” issue completely locks the user out of their user accounts, and that can be a pretty big problem for the average Windows 10 user as any Windows 10 user would be furious if they are simply locked out of their computer for no apparent reason. Well, the following are the two solutions that you can use to fix the “Account has been disabled” issue by yourself:

Solution 1: Create a new account with administrative privileges in Safe Mode

The folks at Microsoft know just how much of a goof the average Windows 10 user can be, which is why all copies of Windows 10 have a hidden account named Administrator that has administrative privileges. In the event that something happens to your primary Windows 10 account, you can lean on this hidden Administrator account and create a new account with administrative privileges for yourself using this account. The hidden Administrator account is only accessible when a computer is in safe mode.

At the sign-in screen, hold down the Shift key on your keyboard and click on the Power button located at the bottom of the screen. From the menu that pops up, click on Restart, all while holding down the Shift.

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Only let go of the Shift key when the Advanced Recovery Options menu appears.

In the Advanced Recovery Options menu, click on Troubleshoot > Advanced options > Startup settings > Restart. When your computer restarts and you are greeted with a blue screen with a horde of different options, press the numerical key on your keyboard that corresponds with the Enable Safe Mode with Command Prompt

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When your computer boots up, you will be able to see the hidden Administrator Log into it.

Open the Start Menu, type cmd into the Search bar and click on the search result titled cmd to open a Command Prompt.

One by one, type the following commands into the Command Prompt, making sure that you press Enter after typing in each one:

net user /add <name of the user account you want to create>

net localgroup administrators <name of the user account you want to create> /add

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Once both commands have been executed, a new user account with administrative privileges will have been created. Restart your computer, type shutdown /r in the same prompt, and you will be able to login to your new account once your computer boots up.

Solution 2: Perform a System Image Restore

The second method that you can use to fix the “Account has been disabled” problem is to perform a System Image Restore. Performing a System Image Restore will restore your computer to a previous point in time, a point at which the “Account has been disabled” problem did not exist. Performing a System Image Restore will not result in a loss of personal files or data but can result in the deletion of apps or updates that were downloaded and installed after the point in time to which you are restoring your computer. And best of all, you can perform a System Image Restore without having to login to your user account.

At the sign-in screen, hold down the Shit key on your keyboard and click on the Power button located at the bottom of the screen.

From the menu that pops up, click on Restart, all while holding down the Shift

Only let go of the Shift key when the Advanced Recovery Options menu appears.

In the Advanced Recovery Options menu, click on Troubleshooting > System image restore.

When provided with system restore points to choose from, choose a point at which the “Account has been disabled” issue did not exist and begin the restoration process.

When (or if) prompted to select an account, click on the account titled Administrator.

Wait for the System Image Restore to be completed. Once the process has been completed, you will be prompted to restart your computer, and there will be no trace of the “Account has been disabled” problem once your computer boots up.

Solution 3: Use a PCUnlocker Live CD/DVD or USB to reset your password

PCUnlocker Live is a program designed specifically to allow users of any version of the Windows Operating System to gain access to their user accounts in the event that they either forget their password or another problem is restraining them from being able to unlock their accounts.

Go here and download and install the latest version of PCUnlocker.

Run PCUnlocker on a different computer.

Using PCUnlocker, create a bootable CD/DVD or USB flash drive that is capable of either resetting your user account’s password or bypassing it and letting you gain access to it (depending on what course of action you want to take).

Insert the password reset or bypass CD/DVD or USB into the affected computer and restart

Configure the affected computer to boot from a CD/DVD or USB by fiddling around with its BIOS settings.

Allow the affected computer to boot from the CD/DVD or USB, and then follow the onscreen PCUnlocker instructions to reset or bypass the password on your user account. Once you have done so, you will be able to successfully login to your disabled user account once you boot your computer into Windows.

34 Comments

  1. Nice tutorial! However, when I booted to the safe mode and it still didn’t allow me to login. Afterwards, I unlocked my admin password by booting off PCUnlocker Live CD.

  2. Holding down the shift button and hitting the power button just turns the laptop off.

  3. As far as solution one there is no shut down or restart option on the the administrator disabled is shown.

  4. you need to do this at the login screen, this guide is for Windows 10 only. Holding the shift key and choosing restart would boot the system into advanced mode.

  5. Windows 10 is what im using, but there is no option to restart when I hold the shift key and turn the power on.

  6. Yes, but all is says is your account has been disabled and the only option says ok and clicking that does nothing but return me right back to the account disabled page.

  7. It depends, sometimes it will flash the home page that shows the time on the left and the power button and the wifi signal at the bottom right hand, but its so quick you cant do anything. If I click ok a bunch of times it will start loading and then just go back to the same page that’s pictured above.

  8. The first one worked a treat and was really well written. However (when using for windows 8) adding the user name only worked if I put the name first. Then /add. Either way my laptop is back up and running. thank you!

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FIX: Account has been disabled. Please see your System Administrator

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