Windows 11 Has Better, More Integrated Messaging In The Form Of Microsoft Teams 2.0

Windows 11 is shaping up to be the biggest and most critical release of a product from Microsoft in years. With the promises Microsoft has made and the strong direction it has taken, there’s a lot riding on it. It’s imperative that the upcoming OS receives positive reception. One thing can be said for sure, though, the messaging experience on Windows 11 will be a massive upgrade from the current solutions, if the demos shown so far are anything to go by.

Microsoft Teams 2.0

Teams 2.0 will be integrated on a system-level in Windows 11. That’s really exciting as Windows will finally have a native messaging feature built-in into the OS, aptly called “Chat“. This inclusion offers several benefits apart from the improved functionality, such as the ability to start a call or send a message directly from the Taskbar. Teams 2.0 is already available in the latest Windows 11 Insider builds for both the Dev and Beta channels. Teams 2.0 will also be available on Windows 10, but won’t carry over the tight integration of Windows 11.

The existing Microsoft Teams client on desktop is based on Electron, but Teams 2.0 ditches that in favor of Edge WebView 2. It will also be using the Chromium rendering engine as its composition layer. Moreover, web-embedded technologies such as CSS, HTML, and JavaScript will be utilized to power the new Teams 2.0 on both Windows 10 and 11. Microsoft will also go open-source on Teams 2.0 with the use of the React.js JavaScript library instead of the previous Angular and Electron frameworks found in Teams 1.0.

The Major Improvements

As for the improvements in Teams 2.0, the headliner is definitely the Quoted Replies feature. The feature is self-explanatory as it allows you to quote specific messages and reply to them. Or, chose one of the predicted options and reply with that. This feature is common amongst all messaging and social media apps and dates back quite a few years. So, while it may not be something new or inventive, it will help solidify the messaging experience on Microsoft Team’s desktop app further.

Microsoft Teams Source: WindowsLatest

You can right click on any message in Teams 2.0 to quote and reply to it by clicking the Reply option in the context menu as seen above. Alternatively, you can also click on three dots next to the emoji reactions and select the Reply option from there.  Microsoft has released a roadmap which mentions that this Quoted Replies feature will make its way over to Teams 1.0 as well, however it’s not here yet.

Teams 2.0 received an update last week that brought several enhancements to the app along with the addition of various features. The most enriching out of those has to be the ability to make calls directly from the Taskbar. Both audio and video calls are supported and you can also start group calls. Furthermore, you get the standard affair of messaging capabilities i.e., starting or joining a conversation or a meeting. More features are promised by Microsoft but this is what we have for now.

You can also turn your camera and microphone on and off in the most recent update along with switching between multiple devices like mics and speakers. The feature list continues with the addition of screen sharing, gallery view, a menu displaying all members of a meeting and the ability to let them in or deny entry. If this all sounds extremely basic to you, it is. Microsoft Teams 2.0 just didn’t had these feature up until the latest Build 22000.123 update.

How To Update

Lastly, you can head over to the Microsoft Store to update Microsoft Teams, otherwise, it can be automatically updated via your server as well. If you want to give Teams 2.0 a shot then keep it mind that you need a personal Microsoft account to use it. And that while you may get access to the new Teams, it won’t allow you to start calls from the Taskbar on Windows 10, that feature is exclusive to Windows 11 only.

Huzaifa Haroon
Born and raised around computers, Huzaifa is an avid gamer and a Windows enthusiast. When he's not solving the mysteries of technology, you can find him writing about operating systems, striving to inform the curious.