Security

WhatsApp tests Message Filters to Fight Spam and Prevent Phishing

Lately, mail spam messages containing suspicious links have become a common happening on the internet. WhatsApp specifically lacked any messaging filters given the nature and usage WhatsApp has had to fight it a lot more recently. Reports from WABetainfo reveals that WhatsApp is finally working on building the Suspicious Link Detection feature from the 2.18.204 beta version so that the app can defy any potential spam links and provide greater security to its users. Through this new feature, WhatsApp will be able to detect any received and sent suspicious links.

Although there has been talk around regarding Suspicious Link Detection feature, however it has not yet been made available in WhatsApp’s latest stable version. The feature is still under scrutiny and requires several other improvements before it could be finally revealed and enabled for the users. WhatsApp users have been informed to not be surprised if they update their WhatsApp and this feature is not available as it is still under development.

How does the feature work?

In a closed version of the messenger, if the user receives a message which contains a suspicious link, WhatsApp will analyze the link for any suspicious activity and will observe whether the link redirects towards a harmful website. When the app detects such a link, the message will be marked with a red label, indicating the presence of something suspicious to the user.

WABetainfo

Clicking on the link will cause the app to alert the user once again that the link is a suspicious one.

WABetainfo

Each time that the app analyzes any link shared or received for any unusual characters, it happens locally. This means that no data are sent to the app’s servers for suspicious link detection.

WhatsApp continues to work on the app and bring improvements to it. Many other updates are expected in the next versions to come and the feature will be expanded upon.

Maira Ahmed


Maira is a system analyst for the last 10 years. She likes to explore, experience and understand new technologies shaping the future. She was a key member of the MUM "Mera Urdu Messenger"s (R&D) team, the first ever Urdu messenger released by CRI in the 90s.
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