Apple

Updated iOS 11.4.1 Restricts USB by-pass DoS Possibility and Several Security Issues

Apple has released an update for iPhone 5s and later, iPad Air and later, and iPod touch 6th generation  iOS 11.4.1 rolling out on Monday which includes a brand new feature of USB Restricted Mode which might give third parties a harder time breaking into an Apple device. The update which was supposedly only a simple set of bug fixes has actually much more to it than evident. The USB Restricted Mode is not in the release notes but as confirmed by other sources requires that the device be unlocked first through the passcode so that a particular USB accessory can be recognized and used on it after the expiry of one-hour timeout.

Apple has termed this new update as a simple closing of an important security hole and a way to ensure that no security breach is experienced through the device’s Lightning Port after the one-hour time duration has expired. The update shuts off any data transference to new USB accessories. This recent update arrives with the aim to prevent criminals and authorities alike from using infamous devices such as the GrayKey from unlocking the handset.

Though the new feature will be available on the devices by default, the switch can be flipped from the Face ID and Passcode menu for overriding the one-hour timeout.

Some other improvements and bug fixes also come with the recent update including a fix for Find my AirPods which previously prevented users from viewing the last known location of their Air Pods.

In addition to this, syncing reliability with Exchange accounts has been improved for contacts, notes and emails.

Apple’s release notes on the recent update includes a few more mentions of bug and security fixes including fixes for CF Network which results in Cookies unexpectedly storing in Safari, Emoji patched to prevent DoS, memory corruption in libxpc patched which could allow elevated privileges, LinkPresentation to fix spoofing issue. The complete list of security patches can be read here

Maira Ahmed


Maira is a system analyst for the last 10 years. She likes to explore, experience and understand new technologies shaping the future. She was a key member of the MUM "Mera Urdu Messenger"s (R&D) team, the first ever Urdu messenger released by CRI in the 90s.
Close
Close