Tech

Spotify Asks for Location Data From Family Subscription Users: People Concerned About Their Privacy

Spotify has been the leader in the realm of streaming music content for quite some time now. The premium music service leads the market by quite a margin. In order to maintain quality and prevent fraud, the company takes many steps to make sure that the service is reliable and one of the best in the market. For instance, users in locations where the service is currently unavailable, can’t sign up at all. Spotify applies region lock filters to even prevent said users from using credit cards from those areas.

In a recent attempt, the company has taken further steps to fix the issue with its Family Premium Subscription. According to Cnet, the company has updated its terms and conditions accordingly.

The Family Subscription Allows 6 Users from the household at $14.99 in the US

How A Family Subscription Would Work

According to the article, the company has concerns that users may be committing fraud in order to get cheaper (2.50$ per head) service with the subscription. To prevent this, Spotify has updated its terms and conditions to make room for location checking. How this would work is that the app would require users to initially input their location after signing up. Consequently, the app would require users to update it periodically to make sure that users from the same place were using the service. It would either require the device to share its location or use Google Maps to mark it (we would suggest the latter, due to privacy concerns).

While it is a good step taken by the company, there are some flaws and loopholes to it. Firstly, in households, not everyone lives in the same place. There may be families where the children are off to boarding schools or college. The company has not worked out the solution well and there remains a lot of room for improvement. Perhaps in the future, there would be a better solution to this problem. Not to mention, this would clearly spark up the privacy debate, triggering users to drift away from this new “initiative”. While the company does say that it only uses the data to mark the location and not push ads, this is not a good enough excuse for highly private geolocation data.


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