Ryzen 5 2500X And 2300X Announced With 4C/8T And 4C/4T 8-10% Faster Than Previous Generation Chips With Single CCX Design

AMD has officially announced four Ryzen 2000 series processors. So there are two X-series processors and two E-series processors in the announcement today.

The Ryzen 2300X and the 2500X will be 4C/4T and 4C/8T processors respectively. These processors will have a single CCX enabled. CCX is actually acronym for Core Complex, it’s a modular unit which has four cores connected to a shared L3 cache, infact the Ryzen 7 processes have two CCXs.

Both the X series processors will be running on 65W, which is quite power efficient being on the 12nm node. AMD stated that the both the 2500X and 2300X will have a 8%-10% gain in both single and multi-threaded applications in comparison to their previous generation counterparts.

Specifications

The Ryzen 2500X has a boost clock of 4GHz, which is a 300Hz gain from the previous Gen Ryzen 1500X, that too at similar TDP draw. Coming to the 2300X, it actually has a boost clock of 3.5GHz compared to the 3.2GHz in 1300X, so a similar gain is seen in both the processors. These processors also support  precision boost, which debuted with 2nd Gen Ryzen processors. Precision boost is sort of an auto overclock feature.

Coming to the Ryzen 5 2600E and the Ryzen 7 2700E, both of them are 45W TDP CPUs. So the 2700E is a 8C/16T processor and the 2600E is a 6C/8T processor. But, both of them have been underlocked in comparison to their X series varients. So the 2700E actually has a boost clock of 4Ghz, in comparison the 2700X has a boost clock of 4.3GHz. Coming to the 2600E, it also has a boost clock of 4Ghz, which is slightly lower than the 2600X, coming in at 4.2GHz.

Both the announced E-Series processors are not competing with their desktop counterparts, but they are mainly geared towards small factor PCs, which often have cooling constraints. Also, there’s no support for precision overclock.

Final Thoughts

Acer Nitro Desktop
Source – AnandTech

The 2300X and the 2500X were long due. For budget PC makers, both of them are solid choices. As AMD stated that both these processors will have a 8-10% performance boost than the previous gen, this can become a serious contender against the i3 series on desktop. Even the 2700E and the 2600E look great on paper, considering their low TDP. AMD also stated that the processors will be ready for consumers to buy immediately, although the Acer Nitro desktop will be the first pre-assembled gaming PC with the Ryzen 5 2500X.

ProcessorArchitectureCores And ThreadsBase FrequenciesBoost FrequenciesL3 CacheTDP
Ryzen 7 2700EZen+8/162.8MHz4MHz16MB45W
Ryzen 5 2600EZen+6/123.1MHz4MHz16MB45W
Ryzen 5 2500XZen+4/83.6MHz4MHz8MB65W
Ryzen 5 2300XZen+4/43.5MHz4MHz8MB65W
Indranil Chowdhury
Indranil is a Med school student and an avid gamer. He puts his absolute faith in Lord Gaben and loves to write. Crazy about the Witcher lore, he plays soccer too. When not playing games or writing, you can find him on 9gag spreading the Pcmasterrace propaganda.