PowerShell Core 6.1 Expected at the End of the Month with only 65% Backward Compatibility

According to the PowerShell Core 6.1 Roadmap published earlier this year on Microsoft’s verified blog, we were supposed to expect a mass release of the cross-platform PowerShell Core 6.1 sometime before the end of July this year. It is apparent, however, that PowerShell Core 6.1 has not yet been released as per schedule, but Microsoft has indicated that users can now expect it to be available on the mass scale before the end of this month. In addition to this off schedule release, Microsoft also warns that some of the features may hash out to users delayed as the whole project is running behind schedule.

Steve Lee (says), a key software engineer behind this project, attributed this delay to the fact that the team encountered significant obstacles in ensuring that the latest release of PowerShell Core is kept compatible with older versions of the Windows PowerShell modules. Overcoming this obstacle required the involvement of many different departments at Microsoft to ensure compatibility in all regards.

Introducing the cross-platform version of PowerShell required that the company ensure that scripts from the older Windows PowerShell still work with the new release. Compatibility is key as the vision behind the release of PowerShell Core is its cross-platform capability in the first place. Windows PowerShell was configured to operate on Windows systems only. Microsoft has stopped investing efforts into the Windows PowerShell project with its version 5.1. The company is now geared up to release PowerShell Core which will work on Windows and Linux platforms alike. The cross-platform functionality is set to be expanded further as newer versions of PowerShell Core roll out.

As Microsoft has set its initial goal to cater to 65% of Windows PowerShell scripts, users are warned that the first mass release may not support all functionality of the previous version of Windows PowerShell. Windows Insiders can start getting a sneak peek at the development already, but it may take a while for PowerShell Core to achieve 100% transfer from its predecessor. Users are thus warned to expect delay in this coverage as Microsoft continues to work on PowerShell Core’s compatibility following the release at the end of this month.

Aaron Michael
Aaron Micheal is an electrical engineer by profession and a hard-core gamer by passion. His exceptional experience with computer hardware and profound knowledge in gaming makes him a very competent writer. What makes him unique is his growing interest in the state of the art technologies that motivates him to learn, adopt, and integrate latest techniques into his work.