Nvidia Quietly Lowers the required Hardware for the G-Sync Ultimate Standard

G-Sync is Nvidia’s proprietary low-latency technology that allows the compatible monitors to reduce the tearing effect during high FPS gaming. It streamlines the frames that the GPU produces and the frames the compatible monitor displays so that the tearing, screen flickering, and other issues related to high refresh displays are minimalized. Only a handful of monitors were G-Sync compatible when Nvidia first announced the technology since proprietary hardware needed to be installed on the monitor.

During CES 2019 Nvidia eased some of its restrictions by allowing for different standards for G-Sync compatibility depending upon the hardware. The following tiers define the type of experience that the monitors will output depending upon the type of G-Sync certification.

Nvidia G-Sync Tiers

For a monitor to get a G-Sync Ultimate tier, it must have 1000+ nits brightness, ultra-low latency, multi-zone backlit technology, and an advanced Nvidia G-Sync processor. Nvidia has maintained these requirements for a monitor to be G-Sync Ultimate since 2019. However, Nvidia has quietly lowered the requirements for the G-Sync Ultimate program. During its CES 2021 presentation, Nvidia announced three new gaming monitors with G-Sync Ultimate certification, one of these did not have 1000+ nits brightness.

Nvidia revealed that ASUS PG32UQX (peak brightness of 1400 nits), MSI MEG MEG381CQR (HDR 600), and LG 34GP950G (HDR 600) are now G-Sync Ultimate monitors, The MSI MEG MEG381CQR and LG 34GP950G do not support the VESA DisplayHDR 1000 standard which was one of the key requirements for a monitor to receive the G-Sync Ultimate badging. Nvidia has also changed the requirement from 1000+ nits HDR to ‘lifelike’ HDR which is an arbitrary metric on its site. The change was first noticed by PC Monitors. It only adds to the confusion that was already present when Nvidia came up with G-Sync tiers.

Lastly, Nvidia has not commented on the situation yet, we will keep you updated once Nvidia shares its stance on the situation.

Mohsin Naeem


Mohsin is a budding writer who has a thing for PC hardware and gaming. He has been building computers according to the need of his clients and is well versed in the area. He is an economics major and the analytical skills he learned from his academics adds to his writing and gives him a unique way to observe the tech industry.