NVIDIA GeForce Now Loses Popular Games Doom, Fallout, Elder Scrolls From Bethesda After Activision Blizzard Pull Out From Cloud Gaming Service With Turing GPUs

NVIDIA GeForce Now has just lost Bethesda Softworks. This means gamers won’t have access to popular games like Doom, Fallout, Wolfenstein, and The Elder Scrolls. After Activision Blizzard pulled out of the remote or cloud-based subscription game streaming service a week earlier, this is the second exit by a large game developer that owns multiple massive online games.

After being in beta for quite some time, NVIDIA’s GeForce Now was launched earlier this month. Strangely, the remote cloud gaming service has been hit with two exits one after the other. After Activision Blizzard walked out, it was Bethesda Softworks to shut access to its popular games on NVIDIA GeForce Now. The two exits have taken place within a very short period of time, putting a rather large doubt about the popularity, adoption, and engagement of GeForce Now.

Bethesda Softworks Pulls Out Of NVIDIA GeForce Now After Activision Blizzard Taking Several Popular Games:

NVIDIA GeForce Now has lost the majority of game titles from Bethesda Softworks. The company owns Bethesda Game Studios series like Fallout and The Elder Scrolls as well as id Software franchises like Doom. All these games won’t be available for game streaming or remote cloud gaming subscription service. For reasons yet unknown, Wolfenstein: Youngblood is the only game from the developer that will be available for streaming.

The Bethesda Game Studios pull out announcement comes just a week after GeForce Now lost access to all Activision Blizzard titles. However, in the case of Blizzard, there was a licensing dispute. Interestingly, the company’s titles were present in the GeForce Now catalog back when the service was in the beta testing phase. In other words, when the remote game streaming service was free for testers, the developer was on board. However, NVIDIA apparently never received full operational permission after the service exited the beta stage and became a commercial product.

One of the most interesting or conflicting aspects in NVIDIA GeForce Now is the way the platform treats games bought on other and preexistent game distribution platforms. Simply put, NVIDIA allows subscribers to buy games on other platforms, like Steam, and use them on GeForce Now. While this condition works great for subscribers or gamers, game developing companies are clearly not happy with the provision. This is because the companies don’t earn additional revenue as gamers do not have to buy an additional copy of the game they already own.

It is not clear why GeForce Now no longer offers games from Bethesda. However, given the sudden exit that closely follows Activision Blizzard, it is quite likely that Bethesda Game Studios may have a similar issue about the liberal licensing policy.

NVIDIA GeForce Now Game Streaming Service Commercial Rollout Promises Popular Games:

NVIDIA GeForce Now is one of the first game streaming services to exit the beta testing phase. In fact, the service beat Google Stadia, its primary competitor. Moreover, at just $5 per month, the GeForce Now is a much more affordable and attractive subscription-based remote gaming services.

GeForce Now does not provide the games themselves. The streaming service provides access to these games. In order to play games on the GeForce Now platform, gamers need to own the game on a digital store, like Steam or Origin or GOG. The biggest advantage of GeForce Now, besides the affordable subscription cost, is that games are remotely run on powerful computers that are equipped with Turing-based Graphics Cards.

Although Google Stadia Pro is now operational, GeForce Now should be able to hold out well. This is because NVIDIA has announced that GeForce Now will offer CD Projekt Red’s much-anticipated Cyberpunk 2077. The game is expected to roll out in September. Incidentally, Cyberpunk 2077 will come to Google Stadia, but there’s no confirmation about launch day availability.

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Alap Naik Desai


A B.Tech Plastics (UDCT) and a Windows enthusiast. Optimizing the OS, exploring software, searching and deploying solutions to strange and weird issues is Alap's main interest.
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