Nvidia Delivers Its Promise of G-Sync Compatibility For All (AMD Graphics Cards)

G-Sync by Nvidia or FreeSync by AMD were marketed against each other until the start of 2019. At CES 2019 Nvidia came out of the blue and announced that they would work with monitor manufacturers to make “other” (FreeSync) compatible displays compatible with G-Sync.

It was a surprise for the whole gaming community because we know Nvidia goes extra the stretch to stay on top of the market. The list of the compatible monitors grew throughout the year, but there was an inherent problem with this philanthropic move from Nvidia.

FreeSync or adaptive sync works with both DP (Display Port) and HDMI VRR (variable refresh rate) interface, while historically, Nvidia uses DP VRR only for the G-sync. It meant people who were using HDMI VRR were out of luck. Fast forward to October, Nvidia worked with LG for their flagship 4K OLED TVs, which supported G-Sync through HDMI VRR. A firmware update later, many other monitors started employing G-Sync through the HDMI VRR. In other words, the G-Sync compatibility program was not a fluke Nvidia actually completed its promise. Nvidia has confirmed that G-Sync is now compatible with the AMD Graphics cards

Now, what does it mean for the future of gaming? It is relatively easy, the consumer wouldn’t have to worry about screen-tearing, or skipped frames issue as most of the gaming monitors would be enabled with either of the syncing technologies.

It is good news for those who play games on consoles too. We know that the Xbox One already supports FreeSync. Technically it will also support the G-Sync compatible displays too from now on. The 9th generation of consoles that are due holidays next year are rumored to output 120 frames per second. These displays will become crucial for the owners to get that extra smoothness. The PS4 does not support any kind of VRR but competition will force SONY to add VRR on the PS5.


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