Games

New World Ends With You Game Software Planned for the Nintendo Switch

Even though it seems that certain third-party software developers have been reluctant to send out new titles for the Nintendo Switch, a release date for The World Ends With You: Final Remix has finally been set. A port of the original Nintendo DS title was announced back in January, though information about the exact time of the release was sketchy at that point.

Japanese gamers will be free to purchase the game on September 27. They’ll have the opportunity to splurge on a special collector’s edition from the Square Enix store that comes with a variety of bonus items.

An art book, stylus pen and a tin badge sticker set are among the goodies bundled with the actual software itself. Perhaps most interesting is the fact that in spite of the push toward digital distribution, those who order the special edition will receive a mini soundtrack CD as well as the game for the Nintendo Switch.

Rather than making a straight port, Square Enix has opted to include new members of the Reapers organization from the original game as well as a new scenario in addition to older content. The background music has been revamped as well with new arrangements by Ishimoto Takeharu. Players will have the option to switch between the original and arranged soundtracks with an in-game menu.

Making a straight port would have been relatively difficult because of the drastic differences in control schemes. When hardware engineers moved from working on the DS line to the Nintendo Switch, they obviously had to change quite a bit of firmware to better support the gesture-based and rotational control scheme that Switch equipment uses.

In the process, older user interfaces have had to undergo some fairly big changes. Joy-Con and touch controls will both be fully supported by the game, which might have been the only way to preserve some of the Nintendo DS’ original stylus-based scheme.

No news services are yet claiming that a Western international version of Final Remix is on its way, but that’s a possibility if the game sells well enough in Japan. This isn’t the only method used to determine what software will get localized for worldwide Switch owners, but it could serve as a good barometer for whether or not the game will get marketed elsewhere.


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