Windows

NetMarketShare Shows Some Increase in the Total Number of Working Windows 7 Installations

Windows 7 might have been launched in 2009, but it seems to continue to improve its market share against Windows 10 according to information reported by NetMarketShare as well as several other top tech aggregation platforms. Windows 7 is also the most popular desktop operating system around according to that same study.

Figures from June that have only been compiled now indicate that Windows 7 was used by over 43 percent of all desktop workstations in the last month. Meanwhile, Windows 10 was used by less than 35 percent. This is somewhat ironic, as Microsoft’s press department had insinuated that adoption was supposed to increase drastically as Windows 10 received some critical updates.

Redmond pushed the operating system after having declared the April 2018 Update business-ready, but it seems that they’re now struggling all over again to get users to update. Individual end-users have a deadline set for January 2020, since that’s when Microsoft will stop providing updates for the nine-year-old OS.

This isn’t the first time that Microsoft has had difficulties getting users to upgrade either. Windows NT 4.01 continued to power servers for some time after it reached the end of life status in 2004. Windows 2000 had many hardcore users for quite a while, and perhaps most importantly Windows XP continues to hang onto some market share well after the so-called XPocalypse came and went.

In part because Windows 8.1 usage continues to shrink, macOS 10.13 now has over 5 percent of the entire market share. GNU/Linux, older versions of OS X and the original Windows 8 make up the remainder of the notable desktop market share. Some of these operating systems have seen massive growth in the big iron world, but they’re only just now becoming genuinely popular in the desktop realm.

Users of older hardware will have some difficult decisions when the 2020 end date comes, because continued deployment of Windows 7 won’t be secure after this date but upgrading to Windows 10 may not be feasible. Alternate operating systems may once again be able to take some more of the market share at this point as long as it doesn’t get fed off to servers or mobile devices.

John Rendace


John is a GNU/Linux expert with a hobbyist's background in C/C++, Web development, storage and file system technologies. In his free time, he maintains custom and vintage PC hardware. He's been compiling his own software from source since the DOS days and still prefers using the command line all these years later.
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