Coronavirus Outbreak Could Delay The Release Of New Mozilla Firefox Features

The novel coronavirus outbreak pretty much affected each and every operation of the big names in the industry. As a part of these disruptions, Google has already canceled the development of Chrome 82 and Microsoft paused the releases of new Chromium Edge versions.

Until now, there were speculations about the future releases of Mozilla Firefox. According to the official Mozilla Wiki website, the company doesn’t plan to delay the upcoming Firefox releases. Yesterday, the browser maker confirmed that the release schedule of Firefox won’t be impacted by the current Covid-19 crises.

Mozilla recently abandoned the flexible released schedule and shifted to four-week cycle quiet recently. The new schedule update suggests that Mozilla will continue to roll out monthly Firefox Stable updates. So, you should expect the next Stable released on April 7, 2020.

Some Firefox Features May Not Release On Time

However, there is a possibility that the current situation may slow down the development process to some extent. If this happens, the organization may delay the release of such features. So, you may need to wait a couple of months to see them.

Furthermore, Mozilla is going to review all the features that are scheduled for release very soon. So, there is a possibility that the review panel may decide to move some non-critical features to a later release date. Mozilla explains on the official Wiki website:

“sticking with the published release schedule for the moment”

  • expect feature development to slow down though
  • reviewing planned features for breaking potential, and delaying some changes”

Notably, the organization made some significant changes in Firefox 74 and decided to disable the security protocols TLS 1.0 and 1.1. However, there were some government websites that completely relied on security protocols. Consequently, the support for outdated protocols ended and it restricted thousands of Firefox users from accessing those sites.

Later on, Mozilla decided to roll back the changes to address the issue in this month’s release. But it doesn’t mean that the browser makers will continue to support the outdated security protocols. The change will happen once the current situation is under control.

There is obviously no timeframe but the government organizations need to plan the transition as soon as possible.

Alex Schoff
Alex is a technology reporter with a particular interest in Microsoft and Windows. He keeps a close eye on major developments related to Windows 10, Google Chrome, Office 365, and more.