Microsoft is Working on Running Android Apps natively on Windows

With the inclusion of ARM-powered M1 chips, Apple was able to run the iOS apps natively on the new macOS BigSur. The initial impressions of the iOS applications on the MacBooks have not been great as people are used to controlling these with their touch-input rather than mouse and keyboard. Apple may include touchscreens in the following MacBooks, but the current versions do not support it.

On the other hand, it seems Microsoft is also fiddling around with the same concept for quite a while now. One could already run Android apps (partially) via the Link to Windows feature that allows your android apps to connect to your Windows PC. However, the implementation is not always perfect, with issues such as disconnections occur frequently.

According to 9to5Google, Microsoft’s ‘Project Latte’ could allow developers to port their Android applications to the Windows machine. Android Apps on Windows would use the Windows subsystem for Linux added with Android subsystem to run natively. Reports suggest that the ‘Project Latte’ would not support Google Play Services, which is essential for many applications. Developers would have to limit the application’s reliance on Play Services for the App to run. It would limit the number of apps available at launch, but the number will increase gradually depending upon the project’s success.

On the other hand, there are Windows laptops that offer touch-input. Still, a large number of devices use a mouse and keyboard, which is not ideal for the Android applications unless the applications support these input devices. Secondly, implementation would take a lot of time. The initial release will be in the Fall of 2021. So, expect at least 2,3 years for development, and then you will be able to run most Android app natively on your Windows machine.

Mohsin Naeem
Mohsin is a budding writer who has a thing for PC hardware and gaming. He has been building computers according to the need of his clients and is well versed in the area. He is an economics major and the analytical skills he learned from his academics adds to his writing and gives him a unique way to observe the tech industry.