Microsoft Claims To Go Carbon Negative By The Year 2030: Emphasis Laid on Cloud and Digital Products

Apple was one of the first giants which decided to go for a carbon-free approach. The company managed to run its entire Apple Campus in Cupertino on solar energy. The company has been pushing its approach to products as well. Most Apple products end up being 100% recyclable. Not to mention, a rather controversial decision, the company decided to omit the charger as well. Now, they aim to be carbon neutral by about 2030. Now, Microsoft has decided to embark on this journey as well. According to their latest blog post, the company announced that it would be carbon negative by the year 2030.

They engulf the entire approach around transparency in their actions. They plan on being carbon negative by the year 2030. Not to mention, by the year 2050, they would eradicate their entire impact on the environment due to carbon emissions. They plan on doing so with a couple of different approaches. Not only would the company add more transparency to its actions, but there would also be further funds pushed into R&D in order to go for more environmentally friendly solutions.

How Microsoft Aims to Reduce its Carbon Footprint

The company adds more graphs and figures to support their decision to move towards a carbon negative journey. They claim that the world continues to increase a degree over time. Microsoft adds that this needs to stop. They emphasise their approach towards more cloud solutions and digital products. Microsoft Azure is added to the mix as well. It will continue to see more updates and changes to support them. Not only that but the company would be paying more for its carbon footprint so that they can curb the issue. Moreover, much like Apple, the company would be shifting to 100% renewable energy by the year 2025. This would include the main Microsoft Campuses, data centres and related buildings.

Additionally, they would also make all the vehicles found on campuses to be completely electric. Apart from that, the company promises to incentivise its suppliers to use more environmentally friendly solutions. Perhaps the company is just aiming to go for a cleaner approach. We understand that many people in first world countries are inclined to companies with this approach. Now the question is, will Microsoft’s approach be synonymous to what Apple did. Would we be seeing future Microsoft products be 1005 recyclable? Would they add actually start copping out with the chargers? We sure hope not. They do add the math for their conclusions and thus this decision seems like a welcomed one. Perhaps, more companies should go for this approach.

Sarmad Burki


Sarmad Burki is a Mathematician and a Economist with a passion for all things gaming and tech. His academics and professional experience combined with tech and gaming adds to his skills giving him a unique ability to observe the tech and gaming industry from various prespectives.