Leaked Images of the Redesigned Xbox Store App codenamed “Mercury” Shows New Design language Based on Overall Fluidity

The UI of the operating serves a crucial role as it is the first thing that the user interacts with as soon as the system starts. Historically, the UIs of consoles have not been great as the manufacturers try to clutter a lot of the stuff on the main screen. With the new consoles, both companies may revamp the UI to make their systems fluent.

A few weeks ago, reports came to surface, showing that Microsoft is working on a redesigned Xbox Store for the Xbox consoles. The “new application” with an internal codename “Mercury” was accidentally leaked on the Xbox insiders programs initially. Now, a Russian windows community called @WinCummunity has obtained images of the redesigned application.

Leaked image via Windows Central

According to the images, it can be seen that the focus of the redesign is making the whole app fluid. It appears that the app is highly influenced by the Xbox Beta (app) and Xbox Game Bar present on PC. Most importantly, the focus of the store is the overall fluidity and games.

We know that Xbox One was heavily marketed as an all-in-one media box during its launch days, the Xbox Store made at the time was heavily influenced by the same ideology. It has come a long way now, but Microsoft remembers its blunders with the Xbox One, which is a good sign.

leaked image via windowscentral

According to Windows Central, the screenshot above are taken from a Windows PC, which shows that the application is still in development. Additionally, it could also mean (if true) that Microsoft may revamp the whole dashboard, which will be available for the Xbox One consoles as well. Android and iOS apps will also follow the new design language.

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Mohsin Naeem


Mohsin is a budding writer who has a thing for PC hardware and gaming. He has been building computers according to the need of his clients and is well versed in the area. He is an economics major and the analytical skills he learned from his academics adds to his writing and gives him a unique way to observe the tech industry.
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