Google Details Interest In Citizens Broadcast Radio Service (CBRS)

Google has outlined its interest in spectrum sharing across the Citizens Broadcast Radio Service

It turns out that a Screen Share feature isn’t the only thing that Google will be working on; according to reports, the company is interested in spectrum sharing across the Citizens Broadcast Radio Service (CBRS). The CBRS allows individuals, as well as companies, to use shared spectrum without having to spend significant resources to acquire usage rights.

Essentially, this means that there will be lower barriers to entry across most commercial activities involving a number of different networks. Detailing the shared spectrum with CBRS, Google said:

Unlike today’s wireless networks, CBRS will consist of densely packed radios from multiple providers all sharing the same spectrum, and sometimes even the same network. This completely changes the way you plan, deploy and operate your network.

According to the company, they’ll be bringing a number of their features, such as geospatial insight, network infrastructure, and computational capabilities, to spectrum sharing. According to Google, this will let them deliver a suite of products to the platform, most notably Google’s SAS.

Describing the SAS program, the company said:

The first step is Google’s Spectrum Access System (SAS), purpose-built to support dense networks across operators and to scale on-demand — from a small in-building network to the largest nationwide deployment.

The shared spectrum platform, even without the likes of Google, should help with 5G; in essence, it’ll allow providers to more quickly deploy 5G across a number of countries. The current band originally belonged to the U.S. government for radar systems and will continue to be used by the Navy, but the FCC since 2012 has been working to open usage. However, they have detailed how it will be used outside of the U.S military.

In short, it’s split into three tiers, with only the U.S military having access to the top tier. The second will be open to businesses; that being said, if it’s not being fully used, it may be used by others. Tier three will be open for the shared spectrum platform.

Luke Luby
Luke has been covering tech as it emerges, critically analysing the happenings and developments to assess their effects on the tech industry adding value in his writings from a unique perspective.