Games

Epic Games Store Privacy Policy Conflicts With EU GDPR Laws, Sketchy Refund Policies

Launched earlier this week during The Game Awards 2018, the Epic Games Store aims to take on Steam by offering numerous exclusive titles. The new game store’s revenue share policies gives developers 88% of the sales profit, which has already begun to attract games like Ashen and Hades. It’s not all sunshine and rainbows, however, as digging into Epic Games Store’s privacy policy has unearthed some very worrying details, some of which do not conform with the GDPR laws.

Reddit users from r/pcgaming researched the privacy policy of the store and found that parts of it conflict with the GDPR laws implemented by the EU earlier this year. Several clauses of the text state that, by agreeing to privacy policy, you allow Epic Games to temporarily share your personal details with advertisers. While you can restrict Epic from sharing your personal information, you can only do so in “limited circumstances”. This goes directly against the GDPR laws, which call for increased privacy for consumers.

“If you are located in the EU or the Epic entities located in the EU process your personal information in the EU, then you have the right to restrict or object to our processing of your personal information. The right to restrict processing arises only in limited circumstances, for example, if you think we are processing inaccurate information. In addition, if we are required to restrict processing but the requirement is temporary, we may not be permanently obligated to adhere to your request.”

As if that wasn’t anti-consumer enough, getting a refund for a purchase made on the Epic Store is a big hassle. Before your request is processed, you will need to reply to an automated email with an unnecessary amount of information in order to prove account ownership.

Refund Request
Epic Refund Request

“We’re serious about player security, so if we’re unable to verify you own the account, we won’t be able to make any changes,” reads the automated email sent to ResetEra member astro.

The Epic Games Store is off to good start, but such anti-consumer practices will definitely raise issues for the platform, especially in the EU.


Source
ResetEra

2 Comments

  1. Umm… Epic does realize that your public IP Address can change overtime, hence it might be IMPOSSIBLE for you to provide the IP Address(es) that Epic is expecting?

    Examples of how it can change including:

    * If you accessed Epic’s site/app at a different location
    * If you change Internet providers overtime
    * Doing certain things with your router that get you a new IP address
    * Using a VPN to hide your location

    Worse yet, it doesn’t actually specify if they want your IP address when you bought the item in question you want to refund, your IP when you registered an account with Epic, or your IP while submitting the refund request to Epic (the last of which is information that Epic will already have. But it seems unlikely that that’s the IP Epic wants, since they say to specify multiple IP addresses if necessary).

  2. I have a feeling this is in the process of changing, as their website has this FAQ for the store:
    “How do refunds work on the Epic Games store?”
    “We will offer two no-questions-asked refunds per player within two weeks of purchase.”

    I also noticed the title of the support question is not for refunds, but about spelling something wrong and changing account info or requesting additional GDPR-like info. OP, can you clarify this?

    “As if that wasn’t anti-consumer enough, getting a refund for a purchase made on the Epic Store is a big hassle. Before your request is processed, you will need to reply to an automated email with an unnecessary amount of information in order to prove account ownership.”

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