Apple

Apple Announces True Tone Tech For Non-Apple Displays & Here’s The Science Behind It

In a viciously competitive market of personal computers and mobile devices, Apple has just announced a massive under-the-hood update that will enhance its touch bar graced 13- and 15-inch Macbook Pros with unprecedented processing capacity. The midsummer Macbook Pro update is set to stay true to its iconic design whilst ramping up its Intel processing units, introducing more customization options for its RAM and storage options, incorporating Apple’s breakthrough True Tone display, and improving its keyboard, Siri, and security encryption. If you’re not particularly enthused by the all exclusive Mac user privileges that just got upped insanely this summer or if that 15 inch Mac screen still isn’t enough for you, Apple has announced that it will be providing external display support for a number of Non-Apple monitors and here’s everything you need to know about this latest expansion project.

The Midsummer Upgrade Macbook Pro. 9to5Mac

Apple has long been known for its immaculate retina display, and with this latest upgrade, it’s only getting better. The True Tone display technology was first seen on the iPad Pro and has since been incorporated into the recent models of the iPhone 8 and iPhone X. The human eye perceives colors in comparison; white will only look so white until a whiter-white is put beside it. Then, the previous white may look relatively dull or tinted. This is the exact principle that True Tone operates upon. It uses sensors built into the Macbook and its touch bar (yes, there’s more to it than looking pretty) to gauge the lighting of the environment that the viewer is in so that the temperature of the display can be adjusted to create the most realistic and true to color viewing experience of what’s shown on the device.

How True Tone Adapts The Display To The Environment. MacRumors

The Night shift feature that has been included in Apple’s devices for a while now operates on True Tone Tech to adjust the blue and orange hues of the display to make it easier on the eyes. Night Shift as it exists on Apple’s devices so far, however, is limited to those two hues and the sensors have limited functionality that is sufficient for the purpose they serve. The True Tone Tech introduced in the latest Mac upgrade is far more diverse so that it is able to adapt all undertones and hues collectively as well as individually to produce the best possible and most realistic depiction of what is shown on the screen. Just as everyone was not entirely a fan of the Night Shift feature despite its studied benefits for eye and mental health during night use, the True Tone display option has an on and off switch. Users are able to toggle the switch with this feature in the Mac preferences setting menu and when any of the supported displays are connected, they are able to toggle this functionality for use on the extended displays as well.

As part of an official report released by Apple on Friday, the list of external displays that will support the True Tone technology in this first phase of integration include the Apple Thunderbolt Display via the Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter, the LG UltraFine 4K Display, and the LG UltraFine 5K Display. Detailed guides and troubleshoot resources have been made available on the site since. That all sounds fine and dandy, but for those of us who like to understand exactly what we’re getting ourselves into, we certainly have some questions pinching us as to how the True Tone Technology will work on non-Apple technologies.

True Tone is a patented trademark technology developed by Apple and Apple has not formed any collaborations with LG or other display manufacturers to introduce their technology into their products. So, how will the displays sense the environment you ask? This is where you must still remain a Mac user to avail the benefit of the True Tone Tech. The sensors on the newest MacBook pro have built in sensors that gauge the lighting of the environment. Just as these sensors work for the Macbook itself, they transmit this sensory data and adjust the display of the external displays as well. So, in terms of technology, the True Tone Tech is not “controlling” the external display itself per se, but instead it is adapting its image before it is sent through the wire to be shown on external displays.

For all the people who prefer desktop computers for gaming, designing, or any other sort of demanding work, Apple has given us more than one reason to stick to or join the Mac community. For those in hunt of processing power that only a stationary desktop or Alienware computer can provide, the midsummer update for the MacBook pro has put it on top of the market as a processing beast with unprecedented read and write speeds as well a grand RAM capacity to go hand in hand with the storage upgrades on the device. For those who need the bigger screen as well as the processing power but cannot afford the iMac display, Apple has promised the same quality on foreign external displays as long as they’re connected to their Macbook Pro productivity beast. The Mac lineup continues to remain one of the priciest options in the market, but now it’s for some very convincing reasons that justify its price. As Apple continues to prove its commitment to its customer base by listening to and investing in the needs of its users, it’s a better time than ever to switch to Mac because it’s only going to get better.


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