Hardware

AMD’s Upcoming Renior APUs May Be The First Processors To Support The LPDDR4X Memory Standard

AMD has always been one step ahead of its competition when it comes to APUs. Their processors may lack the luster of high single-core compute performance, but their APUs show their mettle in the gaming environments. This is the reason why the affordable Ryzen APUs became so popular even at their incubation state. The performance of APUs depends upon many factors such as the bridge bandwidth between the CPU and GPU, the memory bandwidth, and the actual performance of both processing units.

A consumer can not do anything related to the bridge or even the peak performance (for most consumers only). However, as a consumer, we can choose the size, speed, and configuration of the memory that we want to use in our system. According to Tomshardware, tests have shown that faster memory can often improve the peak performance of the chips, especially in gaming.

Since AMD’s APUs are considered to be one of the best in business, one can infer that they must support faster memory natively. Unfortunately, that is not the case even for the newer 3000 series APUs. These APUs only support DDR4 2400MHz memory, which is actually one of the lower tiers of DDR4 memory. As it stands, AMD does not have any processor that supports the new LPDDR4 or LPDDR4X memory standard. On the other hand, Intel has updated their memory controllers, and the new Ice Lake CPUs support DDR4 3200 and LPDDR4 3733 formats.

It seems AMD is catching up with the competition. According to the latest Linux patch deployed on August 28, the next generation of AMD APUs (codenamed Renoir) may support LPDDR4X 4266 memory. The first patch mentions the LPDDR4 memory type and the second patch specifies the 4266 MHz memory speed.

Previous rumors suggest that AMD will utilize the Radeon Vega graphics with the Renoir too more specifically the Vega 10. However, it will use the DCN (Display Next Core) 2.1 engine. The previous APUs use DCN 1.0 engine and the new Navi based RDNA graphics cards from AMD Radeon use DCN 2.0 engine. It makes the rumor regarding the use of the updated engine questionable since the patches only mention the DCN 2.1 engine.

Lastly, these processors are expected to be released in 2020.


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